Not impressive, unless . . .

Museum LemurOkay, this is a pretty blah photo of a tatty old taxidermied lemur – unless you know the specs behind it.  The little creature was behind glass in a very dimly lit museum.  The lens I had only goes to f 3.5, so I used an ISO setting of 10,000 and handheld 1/13 shutter - handheld!

So, yeah, the new Sony A6000 is looking promising as a holiday camera.

My favourite way to idle away hours in foreign is to wander around dusty old museums and inspect mysterious objects in cryptically labelled jars.

Expect photographs that prove this predilection shortly . . .

 

Picking up the ol’ digital paint brush again

Miss Amanda Fish
Not nearly finished, but well underway- Presenting Miss Fish.  Based on this lovely tintype photo from the 1880s.   The tiny original is, in the manner of its time, Photoshopped, with the eyes retouched, and colour added to her cheeks and earrings.  This one, painted using my trusty Wacom Intuos 4.

 

Flies, as used for flyering

Among the masks made for scifi improv show Return to the Planet, a trio of bug-eyed bugs, denizens of Planet Beelzebub.  Dressed up in one of these (with a fetching green velvet medieval gown to complete the ensemble), handing out flyers for the show was surprisingly easy.  A buzz even (ow, don’t hit me).   I was amused as always by the people who pretended not to see me - it takes real determination to ignore a giant fly walking through the central city on a weekday lunchtime.

The mask is made of Instamporph, over a clay sculpt, the eyes are plastic hi-bounce balls, cut in half and lined with kitchen-drawer liner foil.  The paint is acrylic, with texture from those micobeads sold for scrap booking, under a couple of layers of clear acrylic sealer.  Antenna made of instamorph over wire – although I had to go back and thicken them up, as my initial efforts proved a little fragile.

 

Some weekend bodycasting

bodycasting
I was asked to do two torsos, with the end result in simple plaster, so the subjects can add their own twist of paint effects or whatever they choose.  I used alginate for the negative, which picked up every lovely goosebump, and then a plaster bandage mothercase.   After a happy messy morning  the results will now sit quitely in the shed for a few weeks for the plaster to properly harden before being cleaned up.  Makes me want to get back to working in wax and bronze again  . . . maybe next year, when/if I have a better workspace than my current studio (aka, my tiny kitchen).

Rww, said the cat

Next alien creature mask for Return to the Planet : experimenting with a race genetically derived from big cats – in this case, a jaguar.   The mask base is instamorph, draped over a clay sculpt, with the teeth moulded separately.  The whiskers are re-purposed old ukulele strings.  The painting (in acrylic) is still rough, just to work out the idea.

Jaguar half mask